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certain foods make them grow hair?

trevor26

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can this really be true just preparing for when my new boy sphynx gets here end of january i know the breeder has him on royal canin so il keep him on that for a while just curious if that is true with certain foods seen a few people on here say that
 

Lottaskin

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I don't think so. I suppose good nutrition would give any hairs that shine and health. Many things can attribute to hair growth and no breeder can guarentee your cat will not grow hair. Altering, temperatures, stress, hormones can all make for fuzzy days.
 

sfinky

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hi,
not sure about food making them grow hair, where did you find that out?


my breeder had mine on iams and gave me some i have that in a bowl but i have given him raw too which was the intention and he LOVES it! hes eats the bones and everything and hes tiny.
 

trevor26

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hi,
not sure about food making them grow hair, where did you find that out?


my breeder had mine on iams and gave me some i have that in a bowl but i have given him raw too which was the intention and he LOVES it! hes eats the bones and everything and hes tiny.
Hey there it was on 1 of the forums didnt think it was actually true tho lol
 

ypvsypvs

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Hey there it was on 1 of the forums didnt think it was actually true tho lol
It isn't.
First there need to be a genetic disposition to actually grow hair at all before it is possible. If that is in place there might still be other things that need to happen for it to start like cold weather or hormonal changes.
A sphynx that is well bred should not under ANY circumstance grow hair though. Fuzz ok, but not hair, and certainly not outside of it's hair zones.

Food wont start hair growth. There would have to be hormones in it for that, and not just any hormone, the exact right one. And even if that were to happen only a cat with genetics in him allowing hair to grow would be affected.
 

Sleepyheadkitten

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I think we need to check our semantics on this question. If by hair, you mean the fuzzies- then yes, even a great bred Sphynx from a wonderful breeder can get fuzzy legs/feet/tail/face/ears. Typically, their body still remains bare, but that's typical.

The fact is- there is a difference between a pet quality kitten and a show quality kitten oftentimes and most people own pet quality kittens. If your kitten develops some fuzz due to hormones or the weather, etc, it won't change your love for him/her and most people find it utterly charming.
 

ypvsypvs

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I think we need to check our semantics on this question. If by hair, you mean the fuzzies- then yes, even a great bred Sphynx from a wonderful breeder can get fuzzy legs/feet/tail/face/ears. Typically, their body still remains bare, but that's typical.

The fact is- there is a difference between a pet quality kitten and a show quality kitten oftentimes and most people own pet quality kittens. If your kitten develops some fuzz due to hormones or the weather, etc, it won't change your love for him/her and most people find it utterly charming.
True that.
 

Gizzymom

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I think we need to check our semantics on this question. If by hair, you mean the fuzzies- then yes, even a great bred Sphynx from a wonderful breeder can get fuzzy legs/feet/tail/face/ears. Typically, their body still remains bare, but that's typical.

The fact is- there is a difference between a pet quality kitten and a show quality kitten oftentimes and most people own pet quality kittens. If your kitten develops some fuzz due to hormones or the weather, etc, it won't change your love for him/her and most people find it utterly charming.
That must mean Gizzy is SHOW QUALITY!!!:Wink:

:LOL::LOL::LOL:
 

maxtmill

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Would it be correct to say that if a breeder wants to keep a kitten for breeding purposes, even if it excellent conformation wise, if it is hairy, should it not be used in a breeding program? And can it be shown?
 

Sleepyheadkitten

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PERSONALLY, I think when looking at the TICA show standard- I'd prefer to keep a cat with outstanding type and a bit of fuzz versus a cat that is very bare, but lacks in type. While the coat is worth 25 points- the head, alone, is worth 40 points. So when you are breeding/showing, there is give and take. You will never have a perfect cat, but you need to decide what works best for your cattery.

Now, you might ask why keep a slightly fuzzy cat- and I'll tell you. If his head is SUPERB (or hers)- it may be worth the trade-off if you need better heads or bodies on your kittens (body is worth 30 points) and you can breed out fuzziness.

Just my personal opinion :) I have learned over the past year that a cat with great type will do better in the ring then a cat with a great coat (or lack thereof), but poor type. Look at my Selkirk Rex- he doesn't have a lot of curl, but he has type that OOZES out of him. Judges like him- and that's why he made Grand Champion so fast. If his coat was super curly, but he lacked type- he might be a CH by now, but surely wouldn't have Granded in a weekend.
 

ypvsypvs

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I agree.
I also think like most owners and breeders that rubber is not something to strive for, it is not nice to touch. It is also not nice for the pet not to be able to cuddle normaly, a hand can't run smoothly over their bodies.
Problem is that not so few judges do go for rubber even though nothing in the standard says it is better. At least here I heard quite a lot about that.
Many of the top breeders here refuse to go to shows when judges are present that don't know the breed well enough or have a record of giving less points to sphynxes with a coat that is within standard.

1. Personality
2. Type
3. Coat

None of the above should be bad, even for pet quality but if something is to be a bit off I'd rather have it be in coat then type as well.
We don't have pet quality as you call it here though as breeding is so regulated by the federation of cats they all come out pretty much up to standard. Differences ofc are present but HCM is very rare (about a 3rd of the US and since a few years down to average level of all breeds) and so are coat problems (no numbers but it is basically unheard of).
You do have to pay some cash for a sphynx here though. Never below $1600 and the going rate is 12000 swedish crowns (15ooo-17000 for oddeye) That's $1900 ($2400-2800).
That includes some stuff that is regulated though and has to follow all pure breds.
*Chip
* All costs of registration of both pedigree and chip.
* 2 vaccinations
* dewormed
* Healt guarantee signed by veterinarian within 7 days of delivery. 8 days and deal is invalid
* Standard form contract and all papers ready. No contract can forbid you to show your pet but many contracts force you to neuter and state that cat will not be used for breeding. If you want breeding rights often you have to double or even tripple the price.

2009 271 sphynxes were sold in Sweden. That would equal 8672 in the US as you have 32 times our population. :) I guess noone have any numbers about that though as many pure breds never gets registered over there, would be interesting to know if it was possible.


Sorry for deviation. At least I started out as planned, hehe.
Find these things very interesting. :)
 

Sleepyheadkitten

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I think it is very frustrating when a judge goes for something that actually has less points in the standard versus what is important. Of course, a Sphynx with a full coat of fur wouldn't be a Sphynx- regardless of type- but they'd be DQ'ed off the bat. So why place a cat with a magnificent head/body under a balder cat with a worse body/head and no fuzz at all? I think it's silly, myself.

The more I know about different breed standards- the more I agree- you need to build the barn before painting it. If you have perfect type or near perfect, then you work moreso on the cosmetic issues of coat or lack thereof.
 

Mews2much

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My Wrinkles has a hair on her tail and she does not do well in CFA because of it.
Only 2 judges have ever finaled her.
Many say ewe this sphynx has a hairy tail.
In TICA she finals.
I am going to stop showing her in CFA soon.


 

kaoticharmony

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Shiva's breeder (Jinjorbred Sphynx) told me they seem to grow more hair when they are overweight (in their thicker (polite for fatter) areas). Shiva does get furrier when his weight goes up. He gets fur in the middle of his back (between his shoulders), on his hips, a little on his sides, his tail, and behind his ears.

She also told me she could tell when one of her Sphynx was born if they are going to be furry. She said a furry Sphynx is born fuzzier. You have to be there when they are first born, because the first washing removes most of it. She must have something with that one because she said Shiva would be furry and he was bare when we got him. Although sometimes he drops it all.

She said if Shiva was bred his babies would be hairless. He's a second generation Sphynx. Son of George Burns (natural born Sphynx) and Queen Noor. Shiva's grandparents (on Dad's side) are two longhaired barn cats named Callie and Piggy.

Shiva also inherited his size from dad. His top weight was 18 pounds. He is good and healthy at 14 lbs

When Shiva became a diabetic he got furry at first. The vet thought it was the insulin, so just to prove her wrong he lost it all. (That's my boy!)

So I would lean towards weight and genetics.

FURRY SHIVA
 

trevor26

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It isn't.
First there need to be a genetic disposition to actually grow hair at all before it is possible. If that is in place there might still be other things that need to happen for it to start like cold weather or hormonal changes.
A sphynx that is well bred should not under ANY circumstance grow hair though. Fuzz ok, but not hair, and certainly not outside of it's hair zones.

Food wont start hair growth. There would have to be hormones in it for that, and not just any hormone, the exact right one. And even if that were to happen only a cat with genetics in him allowing hair to grow would be affected.
i have found it i knew there was its in the forum type what brand cat food do you use?
 
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