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Chewed bleeding tail?

Elaina

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Gabbi on and off has chewed her tail and screamed after. We tell her off and she knows when she does it that she'll hear us shouting a little. Sometimes she'll leave it alone for months and months, however the last week or two she's constantly been attacking her tail.

It was bleeding again yesterday and just looked awful and she was in pain so went to the vets. They said its very sore and causing her discomfort since she's taken all the skin off the end. They suggested the best thing to do was amputate the end off. We were sent off with antibiotics and anti immflatories. I was shocked afterwards on reflection that no one suggested anti anxiety medication. Has anyone's cat been on anti meds?

She honestly isn't aware of when she attacks it. She just goes for it and then yelps in pain. My long term concern is that she will get a bigger infection one day and she will be really poorly. I also don't want to take any of her tail off unless we have to. What would you do in my situation? I've included a picture of her cute tail too. I can't help but to wonder if the shape of her tail causes her these problems.
 

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GoldHazel

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@Elaina sorry Gabbi is doing this to her tail. It has nothing to do with the shape of her tail by the way.
 

Elaina

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Thank you Patti for sending me that other post about FHS. I am sure she must have this. She licks erratically on her back, random hyper moments, violent eye shakes with the head shaking. Just so worried about her.

About 10 minutes she completely went for herself and ripped it open again. That cone will be staying on until the end of next week. I hope she hasn't caused irreversible damage but if she has I understand amputation must happen. I agree with the other posters though, it's so upsetting seeing the cat you love attacking themselves. :(
 

Hairless Blessing

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Patti gave you a good link. I would either talk to your Vet or see another.
You can wrap her tail in SurVet SyrFlex Bandage.
It's for horses, but, it comes in small rolls and you cut off
what you need. It sticks to its self. But, I would put no stick gauze
On first. It will stay on.
 

Catzzzmeow

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@Elaina I think you have the right attitude...whatever is healthier physically and emotionally. Read up more on the condition and list some questions for your vet. You will feel more comfortable on your next vet visit knowing you are not the first to deal with this and will have a stronger understanding after reading how others have dealt with it. You can discuss meds vs. amputation or maybe both etc. we are here for you.

Patti
 
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NinaGato

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@Elaina
Very much sounds like FHS. You have gotten some food advice and I am glad your vet recommends anti anxiety meds. Wishing you the best with her tail care.
 
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nudieluvr

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Sorry you are going through this. My Batwing is on anti anxiety medication. It has made a drastic improvement to his behavior and well-being. This may be a big help.
 

MaryMary

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Gabbi on and off has chewed her tail and screamed after. We tell her off and she knows when she does it that she'll hear us shouting a little. Sometimes she'll leave it alone for months and months, however the last week or two she's constantly been attacking her tail.

It was bleeding again yesterday and just looked awful and she was in pain so went to the vets. They said its very sore and causing her discomfort since she's taken all the skin off the end. They suggested the best thing to do was amputate the end off. We were sent off with antibiotics and anti immflatories. I was shocked afterwards on reflection that no one suggested anti anxiety medication. Has anyone's cat been on anti meds?

She honestly isn't aware of when she attacks it. She just goes for it and then yelps in pain. My long term concern is that she will get a bigger infection one day and she will be really poorly. I also don't want to take any of her tail off unless we have to. What would you do in my situation? I've included a picture of her cute tail too. I can't help but to wonder if the shape of her tail causes her these problems.
I have a sphynx that chews his tail and screams. When he first started he would go at it until it bled. It got so bad he bit the tip of his tail off. However, it healed. The vet wanted him to go on prozac or something like that. I said no way, not my cat! So I embarked on a training mission.I trained him not to do it slowly over time.

If you want to try and I think it would be worth your time. Get a Victorian Collar that prevents the cat from reaching their tail. It has to be a rather big one to work. Depending on the collar size you may have to take it off for the cat to eat and make sure they are getting enough water when they are wearing the collar. I had to add extra water to the food just to make sure because he couldn't reach with the collar on.

After a few days take the collar off for 15 minutes or so. but monitor the cat 100% of the time. If the cat even turns in the direction of the tail yell "no" "off" whatever word you like. Make it loud and sharp only one word. The idea here is to make the cat think you are in his head.Watch the cat carefully and anticipate when they going to do it and give a should of "off" or whatever word you choose (even before the fact of biting). I did it everyday or a few times a day as long as I had the cat's attention and he could focus. It took a long time, like weeks, but it worked.

He completely stopped going after his tail for years. No every so often he does it but he listens when I tell him, or I pick him up and put him my lap and he forgets about it.

Good luck. Hope it works for you as well.

I don't come here too often which is why I gave you all the instructions. Let us know if it works. I am curious.

Best,
Othello and Mary
 

GoldHazel

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@MaryMary you did an amazing job of redirecting Othello's thoughts. I pat you on the back for your love and commitment.
 

nudieluvr

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@MaryMary I'm glad the issues with your kitty have improved. However, I want to encourage you that medication can improve the lives of animals. @Elaina don't be discouraged if your baby needs medication. Here is a portion of a article.

Advances in neuroscience and imaging technology have shown us that anxious or depressed people and animals often display significant physical changes to certain areas of their brain, such as the prefrontal cortex (responsible for planning and executing activities) and hippocampus (responsible for memory). We know that fear and anxiety are processed in the same part of the brain as physical pain, and that emotional pain actually shares some of the same neural pathways with physical pain. That’s why we talk about profound grief or panic “hurting” – it physically impacts our bodies.

This is huge. We know that panic and worry “hurt.” Why the hell would you not treat this pain? If your dog were bleeding every day, wouldn’t you treat the wound? Would you wait to splint a broken bone because you wanted to “try everything else first”? Would you wait to give a dog pain meds after surgery until you saw that he “really needed it”? The truth is that these medications can provide very real relief for animals who need them, and doing so can be the greatest kindness you can offer those who are hurting in a very real way.


If your baby is hurting this may be a simple way to help.
 

Elaina

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Thank you all. I went to a different vets and they agreed that removing some of the tail is not the answer. She's now on some herbal natural anti anxiety stuff for a month and she has to keep her cone on for another 3 weeks for it to heal. Fingers crossed this is the answer.
 

lealea

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Hi there. I had a tortie with a brain tumour many years ago and she went from a sweet, loving and placid cat, to an angry and spitting cat from hell, literally overnight. It was awful. But we used diazepam to help calm her down with some effect and she managed a short period of time on the medications that she probably wouldn't have had, had I not tried them, so I encourage you to try medications and not rule them out as a way to help your baby. Even just as a temporary solution while you work On redirection and training, they could be extremely beneficial.

It might be worth see an animal psychologist, if you're open minded. They can be a bit pricey, but psychological problems can manifest as physical symptoms and behaviours in animals, just as they can do with people. It can be a matter of just finding the trigger and flipping the switch on it to get a solution.
 

GoldHazel

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Thank you all. I went to a different vets and they agreed that removing some of the tail is not the answer. She's now on some herbal natural anti anxiety stuff for a month and she has to keep her cone on for another 3 weeks for it to heal. Fingers crossed this is the answer.
@Elaina fingers crossed here that this is the answer.
 
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