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Exposure to FCoV

Miss Edie

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Hi guys

Really need some advice and help and everything right now as I am having a big anxiety attack.

I have had my sphynx for 5 years now and she has always been healthy... she also has her annual Felocell 4 vaccination up to date.

Recently I decided it was a good idea to adopt a rescue. I was told by the rescuer that this new cat was totally healthy and had been tested negative for FELV/FIV... and honestly I thought that was the only test needed so I happily took this new girl in.

Unfortunately when she came home I noticed she was sneezing so I took her to my vet and we did a feline coronavirus test and she was clearly a positive carrier of FCoV antibody.

The new cat has been with me for 10 days now and my sphynx and her have been separated since the beginning. I did for the first 2 days allow my sphynx to sniff around the basecamp area where I have kept the new cat (litter box, food bowls etc) but that was it. My sphynx has sniffed those areas but she never did step into the litter box or lick any of the food bowls. She has however stepped into some of the bedding and blankets.

I am freaking out now whether or not my resident baby has contracted FCoV or wondering if that's likely at all.

I also have back up plans to rehouse the new cat with a good human if it means I can't keep her because of this.

I remember years ago testing my sphynx for many things (I can't specifically remember what) and the results were negative. I'm afraid that I might have to test her again to make sure, but I'm terrified of the result and now I feel that by thinking it was a nice thing to give a stray a home, I may have put my baby in danger... permanently.

Has anyone had experience with a sphynx that is FCoV positive? Is it worse for pure breed cats? I am so worried I hope someone can at least tell me what is the reality of this!

Thanks for reading this all. Am totally crying all day on this I am so scared I have harmed my baby and it was all my fault!
 

CathyO

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Can you email your vet? Otherwise, JustAnswer have good online vets 24/7

Just responding to buy time until someone with experience can answer
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This one is an email from our local hospital.

I
 

Sheldon13

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First off it is not your fault. Even if the former owners had not tested her, you can never know when you bring a new cat in what the risks might be. I’m glad you have a new home lined out for the new kitty. I don’t have experience in this, but if it was me I would be more comfortable rehoming. I play around with an outdoor cat all the time and I always wash my hands when I come in before I touch my own kitty.


Love and Sphynx ~ It’s all you need
 

CathyO

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So from what I understand in your post, new cat has anti body of Corona, meaning she had it before and is immune to it now?

Or does new cat still have Corona?

Please clarify so folks here can share their experiences, etc...
 

Condo commando

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As I understand it, FCOV is fairly common and most cats just have mild symptoms. The reason why it's scary is that sometimes FCOV can sometimes mutate into FIV. Unlike FCOV, FIV is very serious.

I guess if resident kitty is negative, and only the new kitty is positive, the safe thing would be to find another home for new kitty. However, how do you know that resident kitty is negative? Sometimes they are asymptomatic. I think if it were me, I'd at least check the resident to make sure that he/she is in fact negative, and then decide.

Just one more thing to mention, most of the time FCOV doesn't mutate into FIV. If you had just one cat and he/she was FCOV positive, I wouldn't even worry about it because chances are it's never going to be FIV.
 

Miss Edie

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Hey guys thanks so much for your responses.

To answer the above question... my vet suspects that the new kitty had FCoV passed on by her mother. She is 5+ years old so she has been living with it fine so far. We don't know whether it would ever mutate to FIP but it's always a possibility.

I think then, I will be getting my resident sphynx kitty tested again this Saturday just to be sure. I am trying not to blame myself, but this is a huge lesson learned. : (

If my resident kitty is negative then yes, we have made the decision to rehome the new kitty.

I do just want to ask... what if I find that my resident kitty is also a positive carrier of FCoV? Does the disease have a higher chance of mutation if there are 2 cats with it in a household, compared to 1?

Thank you for all your messages so far. I woke up today feeling slightly calmer.

I am still taking care of new kitty right now and am washing my hands everytime I touch her. Also very used to washing my hands all the time nowadays anyway!
 

Sheldon13

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I do just want to ask... what if I find that my resident kitty is also a positive carrier of FCoV? Does the disease have a higher chance of mutation if there are 2 cats with it in a household, compared to 1?
Not at all. If your kitty has it you may as well keep the new kitty. It’s a very low chance to mutate.


Love and Sphynx ~ It’s all you need
 

Condo commando

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If both are positive I would keep them both.

But you should probably ask your vet that question so you feel better about it. Assuming the resident tests positive also that is.
 

Miss Edie

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Oh my gosh thanks for your help on this. This is such a wonderful community. You guys have helped me calm me down a lot more!

I will get my resident cat tested on Saturday and let you guys know what happens.

20200218_004716.jpg
 

Toa and Ross

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If I understand it well you mean the coronavirus, am I right?
Then it’s good to know 70-80% of all cats do have corona virus. Most never have any syptomes nor get ill. Only 2-5 % of the cats with corona will get fip.
My both boys do have the coronavirus and never have any issue
 

Yoda mom

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awhh hugs n head smooches, we have several multi kitty household members that can chime in @Toa and Ross with comforting stats. my vet did not test my adoptee, stating could get false positive or negatives so treated for symptoms... is fine, 9 years old , 4 kitties here no issues. hugs n head smooches. keep us updated. do you have a pic of your adoptee?
 

Annejo12

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Nice of you to take in the new kitty. I only have one so I don’t have experience with multi-cats! But if I could have more than one I definitely would. Best of luck to you.
 

crtygerfly

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I don’t want to alarm you just educate. My very first Sphynx unfortunately came from a cattery that did not realize she had feline Coronavirus yet. My poor boy developed FIP pretty quickly and succumbed not long after that. After doing hours of research, most cats live with feline Coronavirus with no issue only about 10% develop any life threatening disease. My breeder was a rock star after I got the diagnosis. I hate to say she “replaced” my first boy but... I have had Igor (left in my profile pic) for just over 6 years with no issues. I’m sure he carries feline Coronavirus because he came from a litter that was born a few weeks after my first Sphynx in the same room, same cattery etc, etc.
Pure breds are very delicate because they do not get antibodies from their mothers like Heinz 57 cats do. That have a very shallow gene pool which makes them more vulnerable than you garden variety. We got Genghis (right in my pic) from a completely different breeder that happened to be a vet as well. Unfortunately he had a bad digestive system and although we fought the good fight, I lost him as well.

It sounds as though you took all the right precautions to keep your naked baby away from the new addition so you may get lucky. I would definitely keep them away from each other until the new addition is showing no signs of a cold but if they ever share a litter box they will be positive. Which is not necessarily the end of the world. Even after my 2 not so great experiences I would love to get another but Igor has made it clear he is the “only” cat in this house . Positive vibes and fingers crossed that every thing turns out okay for you.
 
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