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Kitten from Sphynx outcrossed with Devon Rex?

KillingTime

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So I have committed to a sphynx kitten whose mother is purebred sphynx and father is Devon Rex. I was told this was an outcross to improve health. The kitten is hairless but I am wondering if it is possible, or common, that an outcross like this will cause the kitten to grow hair in the future or have the same look as a purebred sphynx? is this kitten still a Sphynx or is it now a Devon Rex/Sphynx mix? I'm just not entirely sure how the outcross exactly effects the outcome of the kittens. Any advice would help, Thank you!
 

zoinks

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From what I have read in a few places the sphynx hairlessness is dominant to the rex coat. Is the father purebred devon rex? If so I believe kitten is F1 sphynx... (feel free to correct me if I am wrong, those with breeding knowledge) .. F1, F2, F3 which is the "generation"

Devon Rex is an allowed outcross by TICA but not CFA, and some say devons have their own set of heath issues and are not a great candidate for outcross for Sphynx.
 

KillingTime

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@zoinks Yes, I believe the father is pure devon rex. From what I have read, CFA also allows outcross with devon rex if the rex was born after March 2014 (which he most likely is not). I have read a lot of conflicting opinions about this outcross possibly causing more health issues or hair growth later on.
 

Lunettevonloon

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So I have committed to a sphynx kitten whose mother is purebred sphynx and father is Devon Rex. I was told this was an outcross to improve health. The kitten is hairless but I am wondering if it is possible, or common, that an outcross like this will cause the kitten to grow hair in the future or have the same look as a purebred sphynx? is this kitten still a Sphynx or is it now a Devon Rex/Sphynx mix? I'm just not entirely sure how the outcross exactly effects the outcome of the kittens. Any advice would help, Thank you!
I know this thread is from a few years back but I figured I would respond for anyone who happens to stumble across it in the future. This post may be a little long. I personally own a Sphynx/Devon rex. Before I made my final leap to purchase the hairless kitten of my dreams I did a lot of research on the sphynx breed and there common inherited illness. The information I found was extremely helpful in helping me find the proper kitten just for me!

Many deformities that have been inflicted on many purebred cats – tiny size, giant size, pushed-in face, protruding eyes, short legs, long back, floppy lips, long heavy ears, wrinkled folds of skin. Deformities can only be maintained by continuously breeding such cats TOGETHER. But when a purebred cat with a "deformity" is bred to a different purebred cat without that deformity, the crossbred kittens tend to have an intermediate look very similar to the look you desire.

All cats have defective genes. Often a defective gene doesn't cause any problems unless you have TWO copies of it – one from your mother and one from your father. A purebred kitten has a higher risk of inheriting two copies, since his/her parents belong to the same breed and share so many of the same genes, including the same defective ones.

But parents of different breeds tend to have different defective genes. This minimizes the risk of their kittens getting two copies of the same bad gene. That's good. Not only that, but this greater variety of genes that a crossbred kitten inherits tends to result in a stronger immune system and better physical and mental health. It's called genetic diversity and it is a SUPER healthy thing!

Sorry this post was so long! I just wanted to help shed some light on the benefits of crossbreeding the sphynx/devonrex!
 

TniOutcross

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I know this thread is from a few years back but I figured I would respond for anyone who happens to stumble across it in the future. This post may be a little long. I personally own a Sphynx/Devon rex. Before I made my final leap to purchase the hairless kitten of my dreams I did a lot of research on the sphynx breed and there common inherited illness. The information I found was extremely helpful in helping me find the proper kitten just for me!

Many deformities that have been inflicted on many purebred cats – tiny size, giant size, pushed-in face, protruding eyes, short legs, long back, floppy lips, long heavy ears, wrinkled folds of skin. Deformities can only be maintained by continuously breeding such cats TOGETHER. But when a purebred cat with a "deformity" is bred to a different purebred cat without that deformity, the crossbred kittens tend to have an intermediate look very similar to the look you desire.

All cats have defective genes. Often a defective gene doesn't cause any problems unless you have TWO copies of it – one from your mother and one from your father. A purebred kitten has a higher risk of inheriting two copies, since his/her parents belong to the same breed and share so many of the same genes, including the same defective ones.

But parents of different breeds tend to have different defective genes. This minimizes the risk of their kittens getting two copies of the same bad gene. That's good. Not only that, but this greater variety of genes that a crossbred kitten inherits tends to result in a stronger immune system and better physical and mental health. It's called genetic diversity and it is a SUPER healthy thing!

Sorry this post was so long! I just wanted to help shed some light on the benefits of crossbreeding the sphynx/devonrex!
Thank for explaining the benefits. I’m getting a little female Sphynx x Devon First generation. She was born only on Feb 17 and so cute. Very pink and looks like she is wearing a helmet. The breeder says her colour is Blue and White. I had originally enquired about a Devon Rex then she told me about the Outcross kittens that had just been born. How could I say no to a mixture of my two favourite breeds. I won’t bring her home until the end of May. I’ve just adopted a 5 year old male Devon Rex, so I hope he likes his naked sibling. I do plan on getting her some clothes lol. I’ll attach some photos of T’ni the baby and Albert the Rex.
0EB1E22B-4C4B-4376-9E34-32BEEBCC919E.jpeg
 

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Sheldon13

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T’ni looks sleepy. I love Albert’s curly hair!


Love and Sphynx ~ It’s all you need
 

CathyO

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Glad this thread got revived. I’m aware of outcrosses but not to this extent of details on F1-F3. Assuming there is lesser poor genes that remain recessive from the outcrossing, then I’d say outcrosses for healthier gene reasons should trump the outer appearance
 
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