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Pregnancy

Romeobaby

Lairian
Joined
Aug 3, 2009
Messages
1
Points
12
Hi, I am new on this forem but I am excited to read about all your wonderful cats. My question...how can you tell if your cat is actually pregnant or just fat? I bought a female sphynx a few months ago and I can't believe how big her tummy is. Her nipples are not big but her belly looks way bigger than her head. I do have a male sphynx but I was keeping them seperated for the most part. I wanted to breed them but not this soon.

I plan to take her to the vet but I hate to do it if it is just because she is a little chubby. She is 8 months old. Thanks for your advise.
 

ElGatoLoco

V.I.P Lairian
V.I.P Lairian
Joined
Feb 26, 2009
Messages
1,467
Points
188
Hi, I am new on this forem but I am excited to read about all your wonderful cats. My question...how can you tell if your cat is actually pregnant or just fat? I bought a female sphynx a few months ago and I can't believe how big her tummy is. Her nipples are not big but her belly looks way bigger than her head. I do have a male sphynx but I was keeping them seperated for the most part. I wanted to breed them but not this soon.

I plan to take her to the vet but I hate to do it if it is just because she is a little chubby. She is 8 months old. Thanks for your advise.

You know what? I think all sphynx's look pregnant. Even my little boy sphynx. hahahha fat little boogers. That little punk thought it was play time when I was trying to sleep last night and bit my ear and scratched the heck out of my head right at my hairline. Ouch!

Seriously, they all look pregnant though huh? I bet you admin and his wife can answer this one. They just had babies. If she is pregnant, I want photos.
 

ilovemysphynx

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 2, 2009
Messages
4,988
Points
271
Hi, I am new on this forem but I am excited to read about all your wonderful cats. My question...how can you tell if your cat is actually pregnant or just fat? I bought a female sphynx a few months ago and I can't believe how big her tummy is. Her nipples are not big but her belly looks way bigger than her head. I do have a male sphynx but I was keeping them seperated for the most part. I wanted to breed them but not this soon.

I plan to take her to the vet but I hate to do it if it is just because she is a little chubby. She is 8 months old. Thanks for your advise.

Hi and welcome, first off I would say that 8 months is too young to be A mommy,was she in heat? and if so when? you would have saw them doing you know what it is hard to miss:Surprise:, Cats are pregnant aprox 63 days and you would only be able to tell from A xray 45 days into it or your self when the cat starts getting large nipples, or she does not go back into heat. Good luck let us know.
 

PitRottMommy

Banned
Joined
May 28, 2009
Messages
862
Points
0
Ilovemysphynx gave you some great advice. You're getting yourself in to a mess of problems if you have an intact female and male and you "didn't plan to breed this early". Cats don't take into account what your plans are; they do what nature intended them to do: make babies.

Cats cycle in and out of heat starting from about 6 months of age. They will continue to cycle until they become pregnant and females can become pregnant while they are nursing babies. 8 months is far too young to start having kittens. It's the human form of a 14 year old mother. The body simply isn't developed enough to be able to provide for babies without depleting the body of necessities. Mothers can die from this type of bodily stress, either from having too many litters per year or from having babies too young.

In essence, unless you keep your male and female away from one another almost constantly--you'll never know exactly when you'll have babies due. This also creates another problem: alot of males endanger and/or kill babies. Not all, but alot of them do. Even further, if mom feels that her babies are in danger (even from the male that fathered them), she may harm or kill them. It's a tough time trying to keep a household balanced while breeding. For this reason, many breeders keep their females and their males completely separated.

If I can push nothing else, please know that there is deep importance in only producing more cats that are BETTER than the cats you had before. Breeding isn't about making more babies or making money back on your investment for the male or the female. It's very important to have the male and female screened for HCM to ensure that the babies you're producing won't have a genetic heart problem that will make the sphynx line worse. It's a big problem with this breed. In addition, mom needs to be fully immune to everything included in the FVRCPC vaccine so that she can pass her immunity on to her babies. Both she and the male need to be negative for FeLv and FIV. It is also wise to do blood testing on the parents because there's a grand precidence for neonatal isoerythrolysis (learn more here: http://www.webvet.com/main/article?id=1402). A large number of sphynx (and other exotic cats) are type B. This increases the chances of problems if they're bred to a male that is A or AB. It can cause death in the entire litter within just a few short days. It is estimated that upwards of 40% of sphynx have this rare blood type and 60% do not (which means that there's a VERY good chance of problems if mom and dad don't share the same blood type).

The best way to tell that your female is pregnant is to have an exam performed and radiographs (or ultrasound) performed. Know that sometimes Sphynx have problems having young and may also require a c-section which, depending on your location, may run as much as $3000 for surgery. Don't expect your female to deliver during the day when your vet is open either, they usually deliver late at night--when you're obligated to visit an emergency center for help. Owners of breeding cats should have this kind of money available to them at any time since dystocia (a difficult delivery) cannot always be solved externally and there's only so much time to retrieve the kittens before mom's life is at risk as well.

All in all, the better pets are spayed and neutered animals because everything I've written above doesn't apply to you and it's nothing you'll have to worry about. Have your vet check your female for babies and be prepared to stay up with her when she delivers, if she's pregnant. Keep the male away from she and the babies, especially when unsupervised. Consider having her spayed and him neutered after this litter is delivered. Make sure that each kitten is examined at least twice by your veterinarian before they find new homes, you'll want to ensure that no juvenile heart murmurs are found as some sphynx babies with HCM can be detected at a very early age. They will also require deworming and vaccinations by your veterinarian and will need to be spayed and neutered before going home with their new families so that no "accidents" can happen.
 

ilovemysphynx

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 2, 2009
Messages
4,988
Points
271
Ilovemysphynx gave you some great advice. You're getting yourself in to a mess of problems if you have an intact female and male and you "didn't plan to breed this early". Cats don't take into account what your plans are; they do what nature intended them to do: make babies.

Cats cycle in and out of heat starting from about 6 months of age. They will continue to cycle until they become pregnant and females can become pregnant while they are nursing babies. 8 months is far too young to start having kittens. It's the human form of a 14 year old mother. The body simply isn't developed enough to be able to provide for babies without depleting the body of necessities. Mothers can die from this type of bodily stress, either from having too many litters per year or from having babies too young.

In essence, unless you keep your male and female away from one another almost constantly--you'll never know exactly when you'll have babies due. This also creates another problem: alot of males endanger and/or kill babies. Not all, but alot of them do. Even further, if mom feels that her babies are in danger (even from the male that fathered them), she may harm or kill them. It's a tough time trying to keep a household balanced while breeding. For this reason, many breeders keep their females and their males completely separated.

If I can push nothing else, please know that there is deep importance in only producing more cats that are BETTER than the cats you had before. Breeding isn't about making more babies or making money back on your investment for the male or the female. It's very important to have the male and female screened for HCM to ensure that the babies you're producing won't have a genetic heart problem that will make the sphynx line worse. It's a big problem with this breed. In addition, mom needs to be fully immune to everything included in the FVRCPC vaccine so that she can pass her immunity on to her babies. Both she and the male need to be negative for FeLv and FIV. It is also wise to do blood testing on the parents because there's a grand precidence for neonatal isoerythrolysis (learn more here: http://www.webvet.com/main/article?id=1402). A large number of sphynx (and other exotic cats) are type B. This increases the chances of problems if they're bred to a male that is A or AB. It can cause death in the entire litter within just a few short days. It is estimated that upwards of 40% of sphynx have this rare blood type and 60% do not (which means that there's a VERY good chance of problems if mom and dad don't share the same blood type).

The best way to tell that your female is pregnant is to have an exam performed and radiographs (or ultrasound) performed. Know that sometimes Sphynx have problems having young and may also require a c-section which, depending on your location, may run as much as $3000 for surgery. Don't expect your female to deliver during the day when your vet is open either, they usually deliver late at night--when you're obligated to visit an emergency center for help. Owners of breeding cats should have this kind of money available to them at any time since dystocia (a difficult delivery) cannot always be solved externally and there's only so much time to retrieve the kittens before mom's life is at risk as well.

All in all, the better pets are spayed and neutered animals because everything I've written above doesn't apply to you and it's nothing you'll have to worry about. Have your vet check your female for babies and be prepared to stay up with her when she delivers, if she's pregnant. Keep the male away from she and the babies, especially when unsupervised. Consider having her spayed and him neutered after this litter is delivered. Make sure that each kitten is examined at least twice by your veterinarian before they find new homes, you'll want to ensure that no juvenile heart murmurs are found as some sphynx babies with HCM can be detected at a very early age. They will also require deworming and vaccinations by your veterinarian and will need to be spayed and neutered before going home with their new families so that no "accidents" can happen.

So true on the timing we have had 2 litters and have been awake for over 24 hours both times! :Sweat: it is not easy and you need A 24hr vet lined up with A 30 min or less drive time.
 
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