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Pseudoscience allergy testing??

kaylachristine

Lairian
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Jul 22, 2018
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40
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9
I came back from the vet today and was let down by the experience. Last week I took Violet in and they did blood work that showed she either had a parasite or allergies. Stool sample showed no parasite, so my vet said she was allergic to something probably in her diet and maybe that was causing the GI issues. They said to bring in all her food, treats, shampoo, detergent I use, etc. Yesterday at the store I bought Tide gentle no fragrance detergent because I'm almost out of my normal stuff, and I thought the vet could test them both and hopefully the gentle tide would be safe. I guess not though. They told me she is allergic to the detergent, her shampoo, every laundry item I brought in, and coconut oil. They said she was not allergic to anything she is eating. So I'm confused, because I was really hoping she was allergic to a certain protein we could just eliminate.

Now, here's the weird part. The part that's making me really uncomfortable, and I can't seem to find much information about it online. To test for allergies, the vet came in with a vet tech, and they stood facing eachother with the vet's hand on the tech's arm. The vet would hold the ziploc bag with the food or whatever in it over Violet's backside for a second, and then say either YES or NO. I asked them what method they were using, and they told me it is called energy muscle testing, and that Violet can't move her arm either up or down if her energy doesn't match with the food, so the vet tech has to touch her and act as a conduit to conduct the energy. It sounds like total crap to me!! Makes me think of the Ouija board ideomotor effect, or how people once thought was successful facilitated communication with people who have severe autism using a middle person, but how that was pseudoscience and that the facilitators were unknowingly giving the responses.

There was zero scientific, objective basis on which the allergy test was done and I'm upset that it was $80. I don't like that it was presented to me without telling me first what it entailed. When I asked if that was the traditional method used to test for allergies at the end of the appointment, the vet said no, it was more homeopathic. I'm pretty uncomfortable and let down by this, and can't seem to find much information about the accuracy of this kind of allergy testing online. Does anyone know about this? Have you heard of this, or have you had your pet tested this way??? Thanks so much in advance.
 

susi794

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Aug 23, 2009
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How Are Cat Allergies Diagnosed?

It’s important to see a veterinary dermatologist for an allergy test if your cat has itchy or irritated skin. The test of choice is an intradermal skin test, as blood allergy tests are not considered as reliable.

The only way to diagnose a food allergy is to feed your cat a prescription or hydrolyzed protein diet exclusively for 12 weeks─that means no flavored medications or treats. This diet will be free of potential allergy-causing ingredients and will ideally have ingredients your cat has never been exposed to before. Your cat will remain on the diet until her symptoms go away, at which time you’ll begin to reintroduce old foods to see which ones might be causing the allergic reaction.

Please note, many cats diagnosed with a food allergy will require home-cooked meals, but this must be done in conjunction with your veterinarian as it requires a special protein and careful food balancing.

How Can Cat Allergies Be Treated?
The best way to treat allergies is to remove the offending allergens from the environment.

  • Prevention is the best treatment for fleas. Start a flea control program for all of your pets before the season starts. One outdoor pet can not only be exposed, but can carry fleas inside to indoor pets. See your veterinarian for advice about the best flea control products for both your cat and the environment.
  • Use a dust-free, unscented litter. Your cat might have an allergy to the chemicals in scented litter.
  • If dust is causing your cat’s allergic symptoms, clean your pet's bedding once a week and vacuum a minimum of twice weekly-this includes rugs, curtains and any other materials that gather dust.
  • Bathing your cat one or two times per week regularly may help relieve itching and remove environmental allergens and pollens from her skin; talk to your veterinarian for a shampoo recommendation, as frequent bathing can also dry out skin.
  • If you suspect your cat has a food allergy, she’ll need to be put on a prescription or hydrolyzed protein diet. Once she’s diagnosed, your vet will recommend specific foods or a home-cooked diet.
 

susi794

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I did find some homeopathic tests, but all involved sending samples of different things into a testing facility. I would ask for a place to read about the” testing” methods your vet used. Some proof it’s not just a scam.
 

Yoda mom

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Apr 23, 2012
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@kaylachristine There is a local vet here that took me for a loop my first visit with the energy crystal testing with a pendulum
Just not my style of modality - but good to have resources for others

My current vet told me for mine not to bother allergy testing simce it often shows too many "false positives "
So I took one day at a time with the elimination process

Positive thoughts your way
Keep us updated
Hugs n Head smooches sent
 

MollysMom

V.I.P Lairian
V.I.P Lairian
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Oh my word, I would ask for a refund. I am all for other forms of medicine and whatever works as treatment... but that was a dishonest representation of allergy testing. Trust your gut and get a second opinion if you think it is food related.
 

Xandria

Gold Lairian
Notable Member
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Mar 10, 2014
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Yes, I have heard of this pseudoscience. I am not a fan. And I'm very sorry you had to go through this experience. You don't need this additional stress. Find a new veterinarian.
And then have them do a proper allergy test – this involves drawing blood and having the blood tested for various allergens.
Hugs.
 
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