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Purebred guilt

Cinderstar95

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Just a general thought. Does anyone else ever feel guilty that they got their pets from breeders instead of shelters? I am a huge adoption advocate, but all of my pets have come from breeders. I do my part in other ways by presenting and advocating for adoption. It is easy to blame it on allergies, for sphynx are less allergenic than other breeds, but I still feel that I must explain myself.
I've looked for rescue sphynx but at the times when I was looking for a cat, there wasn't any available that I could find.
Often I tell myself that my boy is a rescue in his own sense (even though he was bought) because he was in such dire straights when I got him. He's got a slew of health problems and has been sick probably half of his life. his breeder was grossly incompetent, even telling me to give my four month old sick little guy children's cough and cold medicine to cure his UTI. (PSA: Dont do that. thats very dangerous).
But I do feel a bit of guilt at the seeming hypocrisy. How many others feel this? Am I just beating myself up?
 

MollysMom

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When we got our first sphynx, a friend told us "There are 2 things in life you should never pay for - kittens and rhubarb". As funny as that was, it was still sometimes hard justifying why we made the decision that we did.

Now, almost 5 years later? We support local rescues with donations when we can, and haven't looked back. Rescues and humane societies need more than just loving homes for animals - there are many different ways to support them. Volunteers and donations make up a big part of what is needed too :)
 

Toa and Ross

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I understand what you're saying. I feel sad for all the cats and dogs in the shelters and I feel quilty that I bought new born kittens instead of getting a cat out of a shelter. I try to 'buy off' my quitly feeling by giving donations every month but still feel quitly about it.
 

Theedaysleeper

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I've rescued many times. I grew up on a farm that frequently ended up with strays which we would catch, vaccinate and de-sex when they were tame enough to do so. I donate to the local no-kill animal shelter. I don't value a purebred life over a rescue life. For me, personally, it's simply a matter of truly appreciating the variance among the species. I'm adopting a sphynx because I want to better appreciate and love that which makes the breed unique. I'm always glad when folks rescue. I don't judge them for their choices and I appreciate it when folks do the same for me.
 

Hairless Blessing

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I don't feel guilty at all.
I am a huge animal lover and I would care for any animal.
But, I wanted a Sphynx and I wanted one from a reputable breeder.
I wanted to try my best to have a healthy animal. Then, there is
still no guarantee.

I've taken in stray cats and dogs before. I think it's great
to donate money, food, or other items at shelters.
The one's that don't spay, neuter, that just buys
on impulse, then, set's out the pet somewhere or takes them
to the animal shelters, should feel guilty and ashamed.
I don't have to feel guilty because of someone else's selfish
choices.
 

NerdyBirdy

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Oct 7, 2016
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Different strokes for different folks. Why we judge one way or another baffles me.

If you want to rescue, fine. If you want to buy from a breeder, that is fine as well. Sphynx kittens aren't usually up for adoption in shelters (especially in the geographical region I am in). Also, I want the best start possible health wise. Buying from a breeder doesn't guarantee no health issues as the future is unforeseen, but it does give you a better understanding when you have the whole history.

Again, to each their own.


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Silke

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Pixie is a rehome, and I was looking and contacting many different rescue places at the time.
However -- next time someone tells you that you should "take a rescue", you can tell them that getting a rescue can be extremely difficult, if not impossible. Trust me on this.
I'd asked the Cats Protection League in the UK about a pair of long haired elderly cats they were desperately seeking a home for. Since I didn't mind taking two, I asked them to come and vet the place. I was certain they'd be falling over themselves to let me have those two cats.
They turned me down. Reason? "It's too big, those cats would run away and never find their way back."
Seriously???? I lived in Cat Heaven! There was an acre of private ground, with trees and shrubs and everything a cat could ever want, in a private, secluded area. There was a PARK behind our property. It was 200 yards OFF THE ROAD. (Not even really a main road, but a quiet side road)
21DG.jpg

That's where I lived in the UK. That's what wasn't good enough for a rescue to hand over two cats.
Maybe I should have moved to a 40 storey high rise. I'm sure that would be fine for a cat. Or dog. Or a donkey.
The RSPCA never even got back to me, nor did the other rescues I contacted.
The Siamese breeders who had a rescue area on their site called back to say they don't have anything, but would keep me on the books.
And the Sphynx Association told me they rarely get rehomes in the South of England. (Obviously one came up!)

Oh, and if you thought it was just cats...it's not. The RSPCA (Similar to the ASPCA) turned down a friend of mine who wanted to rehome one of their horses. (If you thought finding a home for a cat was difficult, try finding someone to rehome a horse.) She was told she didn't have enough experience.
The woman runs a horse yard and is a professional BHS Approved Riding Instructor and Trainer!

So don't get me started on rescues.
I will never blame someone for going out and buying a pet, because I've had first hand experience with rescues not wanting to rehome animals.
 

Silke

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Oh and my mum was turned down for a dog (she wasn't even allowed to see them) after our family dog died.
And that's even though one of the volunteers vouched for her and told her boss that we'd always had a dog, and they were always well cared for, and she's known the family for years.
It's ridiculous.
 

kdmotter

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@Cinderstar95 I definitely understand what you're saying. I spent years working as a vet assistant and touting "adopt don't shop" and and tell people to rescue all the time. Since graduating college and becoming a molecular biologist, I even understand the reasons why mutts (dog and cat varieties) are typically healthier and more robust. Even still, I wanted what I wanted, and I got what I wanted. Certainly, I sometimes feel guilty about it, but in the end, I have to live with the decision and any guilt that (routinely) comes with it. I definitely feel guilt on a somewhat regular basis, but I deal in other ways. I volunteer my time and resources to local shelters and still spread the love of rescues!
 

Sheldon13

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As someone who did in fact adopt a Sphynx from a shelter, I can safely say 2 things. First, I got lucky. That's it; lucky. Second, not everything works the same for everyone. I absolutely believe that adoption should be considered first. I also believe that there are times when that isn't the right option. There are many reasons for this; just take your pick. THE most important thing is are you going to take care of the animal you have invited into your life. As stated in an above comment, it's all about the commitment of taking care of those lives you are responsible for. If you can do that, I care very little how you came to possess any pets.


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Silke

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Well said, Sheldon13
While my Paso isn't a rescue (bought from a breeder) he is a rescue in the sense that he was abused/neglected by the previous owner. (Not his fault, really. The guy was an absolute beginner, and Oz is *not* a beginner horse. He should never have been sold that horse.)
People kept telling me how lucky that horse is to have ended up with me -- but it goes both ways. I'm lucky to have him, even if he is... difficult. He's a constant challenge, and I don't know all of what happened to him. I can only make an educated guess.
But he's mine, warts and all, and he will *never* be sold.

I do find it interesting how people tend to forget that, if you give an animal a good home -- who cares where it came from? Even an animal from a breeder can have issues.
 
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