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Studding

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Hello Everyone! I am getting ready to start using my Hunter as a stud. I have never done this before and am not really sure how to go about it. I know I need to get a contract signed and want to make sure that the Queens he mates with have all of their vaccinations and things like that. I have 2 people who are interested in using him already. Does anyone have any other suggestions??
 
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My best recommendation is to think this through long and hard before you decide to go about letting your man do his business with cats that you don't know alot about.

First off, a breeding male is more likely to spray. That increases the chance that your home will quickly become the biggest litterbox known to man. Not to mention the calling that you may encourage with breeding. This is the #1 reason adult cats are altered...because the owners finally get tired of the calling 24 hours a day and the spraying inside their home.

Secondly, there are diseases that are transmissable that you cannot be certain, even with decent testing, aren't being given to your cat. As a basic rule, Hunter AND the females need to be tested each time he's bred for feline aids and feline leukemia. As a responsible breeder, I'd expect that you've already had him (and you expect the owners of the females) to have already had their females scanned negative for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Testing is the ONLY way to be certain that no one in the lines (Hunter and the females he'll breed to) has this heart condition which can be passed on genetically to the kittens.

I would also advise highly of researching FIP and being aware of the risk present. Even a health cat, outwardly, can be a carrier. You also risk transmission of intestinal parasites and protozoan if the females (and Hunter) haven't routinely been screened for such things.

Moreover, what shows and awards have the females and Hunter been to and won? In this day and age, as well as this economy, every breeder should be producing only TOP cats. Not breeding simply because they have a furless being in their midst with reproductive capability. The breed standard faulters when we decide to breed two animals simply because they look alike. Take a look at how badly many dog breeds are going down the tubes because people get two dogs that are a certain breed and let them have puppies.

In addition, remember, there's a reason that most breeders have a closed cattery. Take into mind why they might do this before putting Hunter's health at risk so that he can produce a few babies.
 
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Thanks for the great advice PitRottMommy! I've been alittle uneasy about the idea. I have made an appointment with Hunter's vet to get her opinion and some advice from her as well. Hunter is extremely healthy and I would die if anything were to happen to him.
 
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My best recommendation is to think this through long and hard before you decide to go about letting your man do his business with cats that you don't know alot about.

First off, a breeding male is more likely to spray. That increases the chance that your home will quickly become the biggest litterbox known to man. Not to mention the calling that you may encourage with breeding. This is the #1 reason adult cats are altered...because the owners finally get tired of the calling 24 hours a day and the spraying inside their home.

Secondly, there are diseases that are transmissable that you cannot be certain, even with decent testing, aren't being given to your cat. As a basic rule, Hunter AND the females need to be tested each time he's bred for feline aids and feline leukemia. As a responsible breeder, I'd expect that you've already had him (and you expect the owners of the females) to have already had their females scanned negative for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Testing is the ONLY way to be certain that no one in the lines (Hunter and the females he'll breed to) has this heart condition which can be passed on genetically to the kittens.

I would also advise highly of researching FIP and being aware of the risk present. Even a health cat, outwardly, can be a carrier. You also risk transmission of intestinal parasites and protozoan if the females (and Hunter) haven't routinely been screened for such things.

Moreover, what shows and awards have the females and Hunter been to and won? In this day and age, as well as this economy, every breeder should be producing only TOP cats. Not breeding simply because they have a furless being in their midst with reproductive capability. The breed standard faulters when we decide to breed two animals simply because they look alike. Take a look at how badly many dog breeds are going down the tubes because people get two dogs that are a certain breed and let them have puppies.

In addition, remember, there's a reason that most breeders have a closed cattery. Take into mind why they might do this before putting Hunter's health at risk so that he can produce a few babies.
I completely agree with this post. Also, if you signed a contract for Hunter with the breeder you purchased him from, I would look and see if you have a right to breed him. Most catteries have restrictions or limitations on any breeding cats they place as whole cats with others.

You also need to review his pedigree and make sure of any red flags that might be an issue down the line. Has he been scanned for HCM by a board certified cardiologist?

There is so much more to breeding than putting two whole cats together and unless you have a breeding goal to improve the breed, I don't recommend breeding just for the sake of producing kittens. This does not improve our breed, it just over populates it and thus more unwanted kitties find their way into shelters and rescue situations.

PitRottMommy makes some great points and if you'd like more information regarding breeding, please feel free to email me and I will be happy to talk to you about it.

Cyndee
 

susi794

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Be very careful---there are so many dangers out there--the more exposure to them, the greater the chance of harming Hunter.
 

ilovemysphynx

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I agree with everyone also. I am not A fan of outside breeding with any animal. I know it is done all the time and alot with dogs. Just not my cup of tea. Having both mom and dad, you know everything about both animals and not just what one says about the mom. Both health and temperment are very important.
 
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