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Swollen Kitty Nipples

mytripb

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My 6 month old sphynxs' nipples have started to get puffy. She seems to be fine otherwise but has been a bit more vocal than usual. Is this normal? She is going in next week to get spayed.
 

PitRottMommy

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I agree with M2M, she's likely entering heat. Keep her away from intact males.
 

admin

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Yes, she is definately going into heat, this is about the age a female sphynx will begin this cycle.
 
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mytripb

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Ok its a heat cycle, she kept us up all last night ahhhhh :Hysterical:
Two questions, how long will this last and can we still get her spayed next week?
 

ilovemysphynx

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There is no set amount of time it will last the first one is usually short, and they just go in and out of heat until they get what they want! I feel for you on the keeping you awake part:Hysterical: There should be no problem in having her spayed next week.
 

PitRottMommy

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Ok its a heat cycle, she kept us up all last night ahhhhh :Hysterical:
Two questions, how long will this last and can we still get her spayed next week?
There's no determined amount of time for females, especially cats. More importantly, they can cycle in and out of heat--and for some, it'll seem like a constantly cycle for months until she finally gets pregnant (when it should stop, but some females continue the antics even during pregnancy).

You can still have her spayed next week. That is one of the huge benefits of having cats: Their uterus does not swell and become enlarged like a female dog's does. We see an increase in size by 200-400% percent in a dog's uterus, where a cat's uterus may only exhibit tiny changes (maybe 10%). Therefore, having a pet spayed during a heat cycle, is much less risky for cats than it is for dogs. Keep her appt and let the clinic know when you take her in that you suspect her to be in heat.
 

Mews2much

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Some places do charge more to alter cats when they are in heat.
 

mytripb

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Thanks for the info everyone. My kitty is scheduled to get spayed on Wednesday. One more question, is it necessary for her to stay overnight? I asked the vet if someone would be with her and they said no. Wouldn't it make more sense for her to be home with me where I can keep an eye on her instead of being at the vet all alone???
 

Mews2much

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Mine always come home the same day.
It is better that way.
Tell the vet you want her to come home the same day.
 

PitRottMommy

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Thanks for the info everyone. My kitty is scheduled to get spayed on Wednesday. One more question, is it necessary for her to stay overnight? I asked the vet if someone would be with her and they said no. Wouldn't it make more sense for her to be home with me where I can keep an eye on her instead of being at the vet all alone???
It's my professional opinion that you should permit your companion to stay with your vet overnight, unless you've personally had training in the field of Veterinary Medicine and are confidant you can recover a compromised pet from anesthesia. The AVMA is beginning to smack the hands of veterinarians who send internal-surgery pets home with owners the same day because of such a high incident of problems (because cats don't rightly follow the instruction sheet sent home to outline what can and cannot be done).

The first 24 hours holds the highest risk for your pet harming herself because of anesthetic after-effects or tearing something loose internally because the owners were unable to keep her calm, not jumping on furniture, etc. In addition, if there is a problem with the spay and it happens at your vet's office--they cover the treatment. If you take your pet home and there's a problem, you'll likely wind up with a costly bill from a visit to the emergency hospital.
 
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