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Viruses and Bacteria

Ty Flea

Lairian
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
83
Points
49
Hey everyone,

I've got alot of information rolling around in my head and figured I'd get it down and out so that other sphynx owners could benefit from it. The difference between a bacteria and a virus and the methods of treatment. I hope you all find it helpful.

VIRUSES

A virus is a chain of code made up of DNA or RNA and protected by a protein or fat coating that takes over cells in the body and uses them to mutate and reproduce. Different types provoke different immune system responses and some are so good at converting cells that the immune system never even realizes that there has been an invasion.

Antibiotics don't treat viruses, they treat bacterial infections but are useful in preventing secondary infections. That's why clavamox a broad spectrum low side effect antibiotic is normally recommended.

Vaccines don't prevent your kitty from getting a virus. They only prevent certain strains of that virus from attaching to the cell wall as well as reducing severity and duration. They provide protection by causing an immune system response which trains your kitty's body to produce certain antibodies trained to fight that particular virus which then hang around in the body for a specific duration. They last anywhere from 3 months to 3 years.

Treatment for viral infections is supportive care. The main goal is maintaining until it's over. Providing a high calorie diet helps replace calories burned by your kitties body trying to fight the infection. Providing protein, such as a raw egg, replaces the protein that the viruses are using to coat themselves with. Providing extra hydration, with pedoylite drops, subcutaneous fluids, or even a soupy slush helps keep your kitty hydrated. Saline and abuteral nebulization (with a nebulizer, or vaporizer), chest and lung coupage, and oxygen therapy are used as a preventive measure or to treat complications of viral or bacterial pneumonia.

BACTERIA

Bacteria are single celled organisms with circular dna strands wrapped around a nucluid center. Some have a cell wall, some have a protective coating, and a few have no cell wall at all. Some are similar to viruses in that they live inside your kitty's cells and take over to propagate while most live outside the cell wall and propagate on there own.

The two most popular types of bacteria are either gram positive ( one cell wall layer) and gram negative (with two cell walls) that both come in three different shapes. Mycoplasmas have no cell walls and are neither gram negative our gram positive.

Several antibiotics on the market only affect gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria are the most common and easiest to treat. This is because they don't live inside the cells themselves and only have one cell wall with no coatings. A high fever is associated with gram positive bacteria as the immune system can immediately zero in on bacteria that live outside of the cells. The antibiotics, Bacteriostatics, used to treat gram positive bacteria don't actually kill the bacteria. What they do is prevent the growth of new bacteria by preventing the bacteria from growing a cell wall. There easy to get to with treatment because they don't hide inside cells and have a limited lifespan.

Gram negative bacteria are harder to kill as they have two cell walls or a cell wall and a protective coating. They can sometimes infiltrate cells and live outside the cell as well. Low fevers are associated with gram negative bacteria as the immune system only detects the bacteria that live outside of the cells. Using an antibiotic geared towards gram positive bacteria would not work well as they are "born" with one cell wall already and form another as they mature. Therefore gram negative bacteria are treated with Bactericidals. A gram negative antibiotic actually strips the cell wall from the bacteria causing the bacteria to die. Multiple doses are sometimes needed as some antibiotics can't penetrate inside your kitty's cell walls to get to the bacteria and only treat the one's outside of it.

Mycroplama's are neither gram negative or gram positive. They lack a cell wall altogether and therefore are resistant to most antibiotics. They are the smallest type of bacteria and infiltrate cells taking over cell function and creating more of themselves just like a virus. The can even infiltrate other bacteria and piggy back a ride. They can go undetected by the immune system as they are masked in infected cells. They cause changes in the cells themselves and mutate the chromosomes of cells. Early treatment is vital as after a certain point the cells that are infected can't be reverted back to there normal functions. A tetracycline type of broad spectrum antibiotic that can penetrate cell walls and mucus membranes is needed to prevent multiplication and give the immune system time to find and destroy fully infected cells.

No matter what type of bacteria or what type of antibiotic the use of antibiotics destroys beneficial bacteria in your kitty's gut and gastrointestinal track that help process and absorb food and prevent C. diff. The stronger the antibiotic the more beneficial bacteria killed. This can lead to diarrhea and to a C. diff infection which is antibiotic resistant and thrives in a gastrointestinal track lacking healthy gut flora. Probiotics, which help replace some of the gut flora, can be used to offset the death of beneficial bacteria. Probiotics don't replace certain types of gut flora tho so if all of that particular type are killed off and aren't replaced then gastrointestinal problems will continue. An FMT, fecal microbiota transplant, can completely replace gut flora with a whole new set of healthy fully functioning flora.
 

admin

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 13, 2009
Messages
22,494
Points
643
Hey everyone,

I've got alot of information rolling around in my head and figured I'd get it down and out so that other sphynx owners could benefit from it. The difference between a bacteria and a virus and the methods of treatment. I hope you all find it helpful.

VIRUSES

A virus is a chain of code made up of DNA or RNA and protected by a protein or fat coating that takes over cells in the body and uses them to mutate and reproduce. Different types provoke different immune system responses and some are so good at converting cells that the immune system never even realizes that there has been an invasion.

Antibiotics don't treat viruses, they treat bacterial infections but are useful in preventing secondary infections. That's why clavamox a broad spectrum low side effect antibiotic is normally recommended.

Vaccines don't prevent your kitty from getting a virus. They only prevent certain strains of that virus from attaching to the cell wall as well as reducing severity and duration. They provide protection by causing an immune system response which trains your kitty's body to produce certain antibodies trained to fight that particular virus which then hang around in the body for a specific duration. They last anywhere from 3 months to 3 years.

Treatment for viral infections is supportive care. The main goal is maintaining until it's over. Providing a high calorie diet helps replace calories burned by your kitties body trying to fight the infection. Providing protein, such as a raw egg, replaces the protein that the viruses are using to coat themselves with. Providing extra hydration, with pedoylite drops, subcutaneous fluids, or even a soupy slush helps keep your kitty hydrated. Saline and abuteral nebulization (with a nebulizer, or vaporizer), chest and lung coupage, and oxygen therapy are used as a preventive measure or to treat complications of viral or bacterial pneumonia.

BACTERIA

Bacteria are single celled organisms with circular dna strands wrapped around a nucluid center. Some have a cell wall, some have a protective coating, and a few have no cell wall at all. Some are similar to viruses in that they live inside your kitty's cells and take over to propagate while most live outside the cell wall and propagate on there own.

The two most popular types of bacteria are either gram positive ( one cell wall layer) and gram negative (with two cell walls) that both come in three different shapes. Mycoplasmas have no cell walls and are neither gram negative our gram positive.

Several antibiotics on the market only affect gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria are the most common and easiest to treat. This is because they don't live inside the cells themselves and only have one cell wall with no coatings. A high fever is associated with gram positive bacteria as the immune system can immediately zero in on bacteria that live outside of the cells. The antibiotics, Bacteriostatics, used to treat gram positive bacteria don't actually kill the bacteria. What they do is prevent the growth of new bacteria by preventing the bacteria from growing a cell wall. There easy to get to with treatment because they don't hide inside cells and have a limited lifespan.

Gram negative bacteria are harder to kill as they have two cell walls or a cell wall and a protective coating. They can sometimes infiltrate cells and live outside the cell as well. Low fevers are associated with gram negative bacteria as the immune system only detects the bacteria that live outside of the cells. Using an antibiotic geared towards gram positive bacteria would not work well as they are "born" with one cell wall already and form another as they mature. Therefore gram negative bacteria are treated with Bactericidals. A gram negative antibiotic actually strips the cell wall from the bacteria causing the bacteria to die. Multiple doses are sometimes needed as some antibiotics can't penetrate inside your kitty's cell walls to get to the bacteria and only treat the one's outside of it.

Mycroplama's are neither gram negative or gram positive. They lack a cell wall altogether and therefore are resistant to most antibiotics. They are the smallest type of bacteria and infiltrate cells taking over cell function and creating more of themselves just like a virus. The can even infiltrate other bacteria and piggy back a ride. They can go undetected by the immune system as they are masked in infected cells. They cause changes in the cells themselves and mutate the chromosomes of cells. Early treatment is vital as after a certain point the cells that are infected can't be reverted back to there normal functions. A tetracycline type of broad spectrum antibiotic that can penetrate cell walls and mucus membranes is needed to prevent multiplication and give the immune system time to find and destroy fully infected cells.

No matter what type of bacteria or what type of antibiotic the use of antibiotics destroys beneficial bacteria in your kitty's gut and gastrointestinal track that help process and absorb food and prevent C. diff. The stronger the antibiotic the more beneficial bacteria killed. This can lead to diarrhea and to a C. diff infection which is antibiotic resistant and thrives in a gastrointestinal track lacking healthy gut flora. Probiotics, which help replace some of the gut flora, can be used to offset the death of beneficial bacteria. Probiotics don't replace certain types of gut flora tho so if all of that particular type are killed off and aren't replaced then gastrointestinal problems will continue. An FMT, fecal microbiota transplant, can completely replace gut flora with a whole new set of healthy fully functioning flora.
Great info - thanks for sharing! (y)
 

Xandria

Gold Lairian
Notable Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2014
Messages
9,784
Points
613
Fabulous comparison and information. Thank you for sharing with us.

Most people aren't even aware of the differences insofar as human ailments go either, so this information is splendid.
 

Ty Flea

Lairian
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
83
Points
49
Thanks, I've got some pretty good treatment plans rolling around too. Found out alot of information looking at lab animal drug trials for humans. It's horrible how they treated those kitty's but because of that there are alot of medicines and treatment plans that humans use that were first shown to be effective in cats. Everything from herpes, IBS, kerititus, URI, UTI, HCM, hyperthyroidism.. the list goes on.
 
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